FEMALE IDENTITY IN GANGSTER MOVIES: A STUDY OF THE GODFATHER MOVIE

Hafsa Rehman

Abstract


Throughout the history of visual media, women have often been dehumanized and presented as objects of sexual gaze. This research endeavors to demonstrate how the gangster movie The Godfather denies women the identity of holistic human beings of flesh and blood, having personalities, needs and emotions. Female characters in The Godfather appear merely as interludes, with no direct relevance to the main plot of the movie. The world of The Godfather is ruled by muscular men where men assume the role of agents or subjects, and women appear (if they appear at all) only as objects, that are to be consumed by men. This paper analyzes the movie The Godfather in the light of the Objectification Theory that critiques the representation of women based on their body and its sexual functions.


Keywords


objectification; identity; sexuality; mafia; gangster

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References


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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.17349/jmc118108

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